Making Nut Milk at Home

Making Nut Milk at Home

To make nut milk you need to soak your nuts for a long time. The longer you soak them the more creamy the milk (though I’ve never soaked longer than 48hrs: after a while they would start to mould). You then wash them then blitz in a liquidiser or high speed blender with more filtered water. To blend, the best technique seems to be to add the water bit by bit, about 100mL at a time. Then, once you’ve incorporated all your water you strain through a nut milk bag or cheesecloth. I personally find the best way to extract all the nobbly bits is to use 2 nut milk bags, one inside the other. You won’t get much solid collected in your nut milk bag with cashews, but you will with other nuts. To keep the milk fresh for longer, wash the container you intend to store your nut milk in with boiling water, then add the milk and refrigerate. It keeps for a few days.

Easy peasy!

The only thing that takes a bit of tweaking is the nut to water ratio. I have found that you need to use more nuts than commercial milks use, which equates to more calories. For example Rude Health cashew milk is 5% cashews, which would be 50g (about 1/3 cup) cashews in 1L milk. When I tried this ratio the result was a bit too watery, and so I think you need to use about 10% cashews to make good¬†homemade cashew milk. That is 100g cashew nuts for every litre of milk. Even then the result is not quite the same as commercial cashew milk: it’s nice but it is definitely not as smooth and velvety as milk from a carton, and there is more sediment. After much nut straining and general mess I have concluded that I just prefer store bought nut milk (sorry nut milk puritans!). So I am going to carry on buying it and that’s that!